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Study Shows California Air Toxics Regulations have Significantly Reduced Risk
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Study Shows California Air Toxics Regulations have Significantly Reduced Risk 

 

A recently-released study conducted by the California Air Resources Board (CARB) shows that the risk of cancer resulting from exposure to certain toxic air pollutants has decreased by 76 percent between 1990 and 2012.  The study credits the decline in risk to state measures and regulations aimed at addressing the pollutants.  

 

The study, published in the journal, Environmental Science & Technology, looked at emissions of seven substances responsible for most of the cancer risk that results from exposure to toxic air pollutants.  These included diesel particulate matter, benzene, 1,3-butadiene, perchloroethylene, hexavalent chromium, formaldehyde and acetaldehyde. With respect to diesel particulate matter, which is responsible for most of the cancer risk from air pollutants, the study found that emissions declined by 68 percent.  Emissions of perchloroethylene (from dry cleaners), hexavalent chromium (from chrome plating) and benzene and 1,3-butadiene (from mobile sources) all dropped by approximately 90 percent. Additional reductions are expected as a result of regulations.  For more information, go to http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/acs.est.5b02766.

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