Contact Us   |   Sign In   |   Join ICAC
Particulate Controls

Coal-Fired Industrial Boiler: Power River Coal

Problem: The plant’s boiler was load limited and could not sustain full load operations. They were baghouse-limited, running at 8” delta P and could not maximize the boiler operations due to the limited baghouse flows.

Solution: The vendor introduced Thermo+Plus® pleated elements, using PPS media with ePTFE membrane. They also provided upgraded Mecair® high-capacity pulse valves that increased cleaning capacity by more than 47%. The vendor provided turn-key service, including filter, offline installation, and operational guidance and assistance.

Results: The boiler can now operate at its maximum output with lower cost-per-ACFM at the bag house representing a 39% increase in flow. The boiler is now operating at maximum capacity.

More information contact.....
Midwesco Filter Resources, Inc.
Phone: 800-336-7300
Email: sales@midwescofilter.com
Website: http://www.midwescofilter.com/

Waste to Energy Baghouse Conversion, FL

Problem: Approximately 12 months after this plant’s start-up the pressure drop (PD) began to climb and the number of cleaning cycles increased. Eventually, the pressure drop reached 12-13” W.C. with continuous cleaning. The high cleaning frequency led to bag failures.

Due to the frequent bag failures, it took two men an average of four (4) man-hours per day on an intermittent basis to keep up with the fabric filter maintenance. As a result, overtime was needed to keep up with the routine maintenance needed of the bag house. The frequent isolation of the compartments and subsequent cooling created a severe corrosion problem.

Solution: Since the failure was mainly flex-failures along the vertical crease lines, it was decided to change the cleaning method. The vendor converted the baghouse from a shake-deflate to reverse-air/sonic horn. The vendor installed a new flat tube sheet, added sonic horns, disconnected the shakers, relocated the deflation air duct, and installed ePTFE membrane filter bags with rings.

Results: After the conversion, the operation of the fabric filters improved dramatically. The bag house operates at a differential pressure of 5.5-6.5” W.C. with reduced cleaning cycles. After one year of operation, it was decided to upgrade the other lines in the same manner. It has been estimated that this facility will save $260,000 over the life of the filter bags.

More information contact.....
Midwesco Filter Resources, Inc.
Phone: 800-336-7300
Email: sales@midwescofilter.com
Website: http://www.midwescofilter.com/

Controlling SO2, SO3, and PM2.5 from a Mining Operation

The Problem . . .
The drying of partially purified wet kyanite concentrate mined in Virginia produced an unsightly and odorous emissions of sold particulate matter, SO2, H2SO4 mist, and condensable organics and inorganics. The fluid bed dryer emitted PM emissions at 2790 mg/cf, and SO2 at 3580 ppm.

The Solution . . .
The company installed a scrubbing system consisting of a rod deck scrubber followed by a wet ESP to accept 35,376 acfm at 447 F. This system first captures and treats combustion gasses and particulates from the fluid bed with a scrubber and Condensing WESP system. Next, emissions created from the cooling process are captured and routed through a second particulate scrubber and rod deck absorber to proved a clean, preheated gas stream. This gas is then routed back into the fluid-bed burner as combustion air. This closed loop system crated around the plant's cooler allows for the combustion of pollutants that cannot be removed by traditional scrubbing mechanisms.

The Result . . .
Stack opacity, which could reach 60%, was reduced to near zero. Removal efficiencies were 99.6% for PM2.5, 99.4% for SO2, 93% for acid mist, and roughly 90% for condensed inorganic and organic material. The WESP also cut NOx by about 50%. Operation reliability is high due to no moving parts.

For More Information . . .
Go to Members Products & Services for a list of member companies that provide these services.

Controlling Particulate Matter from a Large Cafeteria

The Problem . . .
Newport Towers, located on the waterfront in Jersey City, NJ, operates a large cafeteria. Smoke generated by commercial cooking equipment typically has a particulate size between 0.3 and 0.8 microns. The Newport Towers management wanted 95% particulate reduction, a discharge with opacity from 0 to 5%.

The Solution . . .
The supplier provided a heavy-duty, three-pass electrostatic precipitator (ESP) system, which is three ESPs in line within a single housing. Each ESP is composed of four collecting modules, and each of the three stages is energized separately by a microprocessor-controlled, "intelligent" power supply. This means that one or two stages will usually continue working while one stage is adjusting to a "spark" discharge or other transient event. Standard building service of 220 volts was brought to each power supply, which converts it to 15,000 volts to the precipitator cells.

The Result . . .
The ESP systems is operating well with zero percent opacity smoke pollution. The system was easy to install, and predicted maintenance (cleaning) is only once a year.

For More Information . . .
Go to Members Products & Services for a list of member companies that provide these services.

Controlling Particulate Matter Emissions from a Waste-Wood-Fueled Boiler

The Problem . . .
Engineers at a major manufacturing plant wanted to replace a faulty wet venturi scrubber operating on a waste-wood-fueled boiler at their California plant. The company engineers wanted a system that would drastically lower flyash output, operate efficiently on the variable fuel, and resist fires. They also wanted a system that could be engineered, fabricated, installed, and on-line within 8 months.

The Solution . . .
The company looked at various ways it could clean the stack emissions generated by its fixed-grate, stoker boiler, including fabric filters and dry electrostatic precipitators (ESP). A pilot study conducted by a control technology supplier convinced the manufacturer that a wet ESP would meet their requirements.

The control technology supplier conducted its pilot study on site with a mobile wet ESP, prequench chamber, and testing laboratory. Test results showed that the stacks were handling nearly 50,000 dry standard cubic feet per minute of flue gas. This information was used in sizing the full-scale wet ESP system.

The control technology supplier designed, engineered, and installed a wet ESP (composed of six modules) with inlet duct, prequench chamber, and outlet stack. All surfaces exposed to the wet flue gas were made from 316L stainless steel.

The Result . . .
The control technology supplier was instructed by the manufacturing company engineers to keep the particulate concentration (front and back half as defined by the South Coast Air Quality Management District or SCAQMD) of emissions below 0.020 grains/dry standard cubic foot. The control technology suppplier developed an air pollution control system that is controlling particulate well below these requirements.

For More Information . . .
Go to Members Products & Services for a list of member companies that provide these services.

Controlling PM Emissions from Multi-Fuel Boilers at a Paper Mill

The Problem . . .
As part of a plant upgrade, a leading paper manufacturer was required to comply with new more stringent air emission standards for its No. 1 and No. 2 power boilers. These multi-fuel boilers burn an assortment of wood/bark, sludge, coal, tire derived fuel (TDF) and oil. The boilers produce approximately 500,000 lbs. of steam per hour each, and operate 24 hours/day, 350 days/year.

The old system, installed in 1974, worked very well until the capacity of the two boilers was increased in the mid 1990s. The large increase in gas volume from the boilers caused excessive particulate emissions and increased stack opacity levels. However, the most annoying effect for the mill personnel was "raining" of dirty liquid droplets from the stacks. The purchase order for the new system contained a very strict limitation for liquid discharge from the stacks with performance guarantees.

The Solution . . .
In order to meet the gas volume per boiler of approximately 450,000 ACFM at 390 degrees F, with a maximum particulate loading of 2,680 lbs/hr, control technology supplier provided two turnkey gas cleaning systems. Of particular concern was the ability of the systems to handle process gas volume fluctuations. Therefore, each Venturi was equipped with a double bladed large diameter adjustable throat Venturi scrubber, which ensures constant pressure drop to accommodate variations in flue gas volume. Also included was a cyclonic separator, exhaust stack and recycle tank. The project also included structural support towers, stairways, ductwork, instrumentation, demolition of existing equipment and installation, commissioning and start-up. A very aggressive project schedule was met and the final tie-in was on time and extremely smooth.

The advantage to the Venturi system is that it can practically be designed for any particulate emission level and can be upgraded to meet future regulations.

The Result . . .
The system easily met and exceeded the State requirements for particulate emissions, not to exceed 0.28 lbs per million BTU at maximum inlet (118.4 lbs/hr at average inlet). Actual results were less than one third of allowable at very low pressure drop.

For More Information . . .
Go to Members Products & Services for a list of member companies that provide these services.

Controlling Submicron Droplets from a Broadloom Plant

The Problem . . .
While producing broadloom carpeting, oil and chemical surfactants from the yarn evaporate with the exhaust stream, and pass out the stack at a temperature of about 140°F. When oil and other chemicals condense at the exit of the stack where ambient temperature is much cooler than 140°F, the products of condensation become submicron droplets and create opacity. At this facility, exhaust gas flow was 25,000 acfm, saturated, at 120°F, producing stack-gas plume of 60% opacity. Opacity abatement by various scrubbing operations had been attempted, but opacities still remained at about 20%, at the cost of an energy-wasting 14" pressure drop.

The Solution . . .
The broadloom plant decided to install a wet electrostatic precipitator (WESP) system. This technology consists of a precipitator, a cooling tower, a water treatment system (which includes a oil/water separator and a conventional separator), and electronic controls.

The Result . . .
The WESP system attained zero opacity with just 1" (one inch water column) pressure drop at the broadloom plant.

For More Information . . .
Go to Members Products & Services for a list of member companies that provide these services.

Membership Management Software Powered by YourMembership  ::  Legal